Single-Flush vs. Dual-Flush Toilets | Mattioni Plumbing
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Single-Flush vs. Dual-Flush Toilets

Single-Flush vs. Dual-Flush Toilets

June 1, 2015

If you’re remodeling your bathroom, it’s important to know the pros and cons of regular versus dual flush toilets. They’ve become a popular item in the last few years, and although they’re a green addition to anyone’s home, they may not be the right option for everyone.

Single-flush Toilets

Single-flush toilets are the most common type of toilet found in older homes and buildings. They have only one flush mechanism — meaning that all types of waste are flushed with the same amount of water, sometimes as much as 5 gallons. Dual-flush toilets, on the other hand, have two flush mechanisms — normally, two buttons located on the top of the tank instead of a lever. One button engages a flush using less water (about 0.8 gallons) that is meant only for liquid waste, while the other button engages a flush meant for solid waste (about 1.6 gallons).

Because single-flush toilets are traditionally more common in homes and workplaces, it’s often easier to find replacement parts for them if something in the tank breaks and can also result in cheaper repair costs. Additionally, some consumers prefer single-flush toilets for aesthetic reasons, preferring the lever (which can be changed depending on personal style) over the button.

However, single-flush toilets also consume significantly more water than their alternatives, making them more harmful to the environment and costly for your water bill.

If a single-flush toilet sounds like it’s best for you, contact us today for toilet installation and services in Pennsylvania!

Dual-flush Toilets

Dual-flush toilets, by comparison, use much less water and are considered to be environmentally friendly. Using one can lead to lower water bills, saving your household money over time. However, some consumers feel that they are more difficult to flush — the buttons located on the top of the tank can sometimes require greater force to press than a lever does, which can be difficult for disabled or elderly persons. Because they’re less common (for now), replacement parts can be trickier to come by and repairs may be pricier if something goes wrong.

Whether you’re remodeling an outdated bathroom, building a new home, or renovating the office, it’s important to know the benefits and drawbacks of both single- and dual-flush toilets so you can make the smartest decision for your space and your wallet.

Are you ready to get a new single- or dual-flush toilet? Contact Mattioni Plumbing, Heating & Cooling, Inc. at 610-400-85100 today for toilet installation and services in PA.